Martell supports Versailles: A partnership of excellence

Excellence

Versailles represents the exquisite perfection that artists and master craftsmen can achieve, and the Palace plays a leading role in promoting French culture and art around the world. Versailles was also a temple of innovative and subtle gastronomic excellence. From its very beginnings in 1715, the same year as the reign of Louis XIV ended, the House of Martelladopted these values of excellence and rapidly became a supplier to some of the world’s leading figures.

Martell cognacs were served at the tables of the Duke of Orleans in France, the Emperor of Austria, the tsars of Russia, the kings of England, and then of Napoleon I… Versailles and Martell share the same passion for beauty, the same quest for perfection, and the same vision of luxury, the French “art of living”, and the finest gastronomy. It is in this spirit that Martell decided to support the restoration to its former splendour of the famous Queen’s Antechamber at Versailles, where the sumptuous daily ritual of the king’s ceremonial dinner was performed.

Gastronomy

It was in Versailles, during the reign of Louis XIV, that France’s culinary art rose to pre-eminence in Europe. The king was a keen admirer of gastronomic refine-ment and innovation.

A custom inherited from the Middle Ages, the meal taken in public was a symbol of power. it was a ritual organised with extreme precision.

The Queen’s Antechamber was where these remarkable developments took place; it was here that the great tradition of French cuisine was born. By supporting its resto-ration, Martell has demonstrated its passion for this prestigious heritage: gastronomy, and harmonious pairings between dishes, wines and spirits.

And when it comes to cognac, this excellence is even more pronounced, because all of the cognac consumed around the world comes from a small area in France covering around 185,000 acres – and nowhere else.

From Art to Art

Jean Martell, the founder of the House, was a visionary. In 1715, he foresaw the incredible potential of what were known at the time as “burnt wines” (i.e. distilled wines) from the Charente region. Without further ado, he founded his own trad-ing business. Martell was the first of the great cognac Houses. Over time, he acquired his own vine-yards and established the basis of the “Martell style”. As well as its favour-able climate and soil, the region offered him a unique know-how, which he developed and enriched. This know-how, handed down from generation to generation, gave Martell its international reputation and cul-tural heritage. A leading name in the history of French gastronomy, Martell helps to promote the culture of France. For 300 years, Martell cognac has been synonymous with refinement and fine living, all around the world. It is the guest of honour at the very best tables.

At every stage of production, Martell applies the same uncom-promising quality standards, and the “Martell Method” gives its cognacs a highly recognisable style. After the harvest, the juices are viniꄀed. Martell only distils clear wines, without their lees, and keeps only a portion of the distillates known as the “heart”.Then time plays its part: the eaux-de-vie age for years and decades in ꄀne-grain oak casks, where they develop elegant, complex aromas. The blending is decisive: up to several hundred eaux-de-vie from di꜀erent terroirs and di꜀erent years can be blended in one Martell cognac. The work of the cellar master requires years of experience, along with a highly developed memory and ability to concentrate. Each Martell cognac is created like a work of art…

A custom inherited from the Middle Ages, the meal taken in public was a symbol of power. it was a ritual organised with extreme precision.

The Queen’s Antechamber was where these remarkable developments took place; it was here that the great tradition of French cuisine was born. By supporting its resto-ration, Martell has demonstrated its passion for this prestigious heritage: gastronomy, and harmonious pairings between dishes, wines and spirits.

And when it comes to cognac, this excellence is even more pronounced, because all of the cognac consumed around the world comes from a small area in France covering around 185,000 acres – and nowhere else.

Have a look at the video: http://www.the-queens-antechamber.com/


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